Owen and diana dating

The “O-I” mark shown on this page is on the heel of an emerald green ALE81 soda bottle made in 2011.

Other marks include “ILLINOIS” a brand name apparently used for a line of prescription bottles (similar to their bottles marked “OWENS”); “DURAGLAS“, a trademark used after 1940 and which appears embossed on innumerable bottles of many types; and “LOWEX” another brand name which was used for their borosilicate glass forumula employed especially for power line insulators.

Although Owens-Illinois has made containers of many different shades of color over the years, the great majority of glass bottles commonly found (especially older containers that show up often at flea markets, antique malls, yard sales, junk shops, ebay, etc) are made of clear (colorless), green (emerald, forest green or “seven up” green) and amber (“beer bottle brown”) glass.

(The second most common mark encountered is probably that of the Hazel-Atlas Glass Company.) Owens-Illinois took over operation of the Hemingray Glass Company factory, located in Muncie, Indiana, in 1933.

Hemingray was a prolific maker of electrical insulators (of many types and sizes) for power lines, telegraph, telephone and other uses.

To return to the main Glass Bottle Marks page, please click here. Please check out my summary page on Sea Glass / Beach Glass.

Many old Owens-Illinois bottle and jar bases might be found among so-called “Beach Glass”.

Presumably, when this particular mold was pulled out of the storeroom, and used to produce some more bottles (probably for a relatively small order), it wasn’t considered important enough to take the time to re-engrave the trademark.

Last modified 04-Dec-2016 16:02